Student-Faculty Programs Office
Summer 2017 Announcements of Opportunity

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Project:  Probing Fundamental Physics and the Large Scale Structure of the Universe with Galaxy Redshift Surveys
Disciplines:  Astronomy/Astrophysics, Physics/Applied Physics
Mentor:  Olivier Dore, (JPL), Olivier.P.Dore@jpl.nasa.gov, Phone: (818) 354-0690
Background:  The past decade has seen the emergence of cosmology as a precision science. While the era of precision cosmology was heralded by the advent of measurements of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation of unprecedented accuracy, galaxy redshift surveys are arguably the strongest cosmological probe of the near future. Spectroscopic galaxy surveys allow the construction of three-dimensional maps, covering large volumes, of the distribution of galaxies. Since on large scales, the number density of galaxies traces the underlying density of both dark and visible matter, these galaxy maps can be used to infer the statistical properties of the clustering of all matter in the universe and the growth of structure. Galaxy clustering data from surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the two-degree Field survey and WiggleZ, have already been used to place strong constraints on fundamental physics, including the pressure-to-density ratio of the mysterious dark energy, and the nature of gravity itself.
Description:  The past decade has seen the emergence of cosmology as a precision science. While the era of precision cosmology was heralded by the advent of measurements of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background radiation of unprecedented accuracy, galaxy redshift surveys are arguably the strongest cosmological probe of the near future. Spectroscopic galaxy surveys allow the construction of three-dimensional maps, covering large volumes, of the distribution of galaxies. Since on large scales, the number density of galaxies traces the underlying density of both dark and visible matter, these galaxy maps can be used to infer the statistical properties of the clustering of all matter in the universe and the growth of structure. Galaxy clustering data from surveys such as the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the two-degree Field survey and WiggleZ, have already been used to place strong constraints on fundamental physics, including the pressure-to-density ratio of the mysterious dark energy, and the nature of gravity itself.
References:  C.P.Ahn et al (2013), http://arxiv.org/abs/1307.7735 (SDSS Data Release 10 article) SDSS Data Release 10, http://www.sdss3.org/dr10/ BOSS, http://www.sdss3.org/surveys/boss.php L. Anderson et al (2012), Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 427, 3435 (BAO measurement from BOSS) L. Anderson et al (2013), http://arxiv.org/abs/1303.4666 (anisotropic clustering measurement from BOSS)
Student Requirements:  Programming: C, Fortran, Python, Linux. Good knowledge of classical physics and/or astrophysics. Knowledge of general relativity and/or cosmology a plus, but not required. Good knowledge of probability and statistics, advanced calculus, linear algebra.
Location / Safety:  Project building and/or room locations: . Student will need special safety training: No.
Programs:  This AO can be done under the following programs:

  Program    Available To
       SURF    both Caltech and non-Caltech students 

Click on a program name for program info and application requirements.


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Problems with or questions about submitting an AO?  Call Jen Manglos of the Student-Faculty Programs Office at (626) 395-2885.
 
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